Specsavers Audiology opens first two businesses – in Qld

Specsavers officially launches its first audiology business today at a local event in the Specsavers Runaway Bay optical store on Queensland’s Gold Coast.

Specsavers Audiology Runaway Bay and Specsavers Audiology Tweed City open their doors to their first customers today and tomorrow respectively.

  • Each new business has an individual franchise partner: at Runaway Bay, Andrew Fraser opens an audiology clinic within the Specsavers Runaway Bay optical store, while his sister, Rochelle Fraser, opens her business within the Specsavers Tweed City optical store. Both Andrew and Rochelle Fraser are audiologists of more than 15 years standing.
  • Specsavers aims to open as many as 100 audiology businesses in the coming 12-18 months, providing audiology services in up to 200 of its optical locations.
  • The two audiology franchise openings foreshadow a national rollout of Specsavers Audiology businesses across Australia, with Specsavers optical stores due to act as hosts to all the new businesses.

“As we open the first of many audiology businesses across Australia we stand by our commitment to offer quality professional service and value in hearing-device technology,” Specsavers Audiology executive director Darrel Magna said.

Separate franchise businesses

Mr Magna confirmed that each Specsavers Audiology business will be hosted within a local Specsavers optical store but will operate as a separate franchise business, with audiology professionals

Read More >

By | August 29th, 2017|Business|

ODMA and Expertise Events mediation concluded

MEDIATION between the Optical Distributors and Manufacturers Association of Australia and Expertise Events over their dispute in regard to copyright, address list, etc was concluded on 4 August.

The mediation was held on 4 August; the matter was resolved at the mediation conference; and the matter is now concluded.

Registrar Tesoriero made that order in Sydney on 4 August, which was stamped on 8 August.

No further information is available.

What it was all about:

An ex-parte injunction granted by the Federal Court of Australia to ODMA against Expertise Events on 16 December 2016 was thrown out “in its entirety” by Justice Burley on 3 March.

Justice Burley found that ODMA had not made out its claim that the court should maintain the injunction against EE and that the evidence did not indicate any material harm would occur to ODMA if the injunction was discharged.

The injunction was granted by Justice Farrell of the Federal Court on 16 December against EE, the former organiser of ODMA’s 2013 and 2015 trade exhibitions, after hearing ODMA’s claim that EE had breached its intellectual property rights by soliciting for business using ODMA’s address information, as well as being in breach of copyright.

EE not present when orders were made

EE was not notified of the application hearing and was not present when the

Read More >

By | August 29th, 2017|Legal|

Ulysses comments …

 

Hearing-aid business will never be the same again

THE news that Specsavers is to open hearing centres here will put the cat among the pigeons in the long-over-priced audiology and audiometry fields of endeavor. Specsavers has built a big hearing business in the United Kingdom and there seems no reason why it won’t be able to do the same here.

If what has happened to optometry and optical dispensing in Australia is any guide, the two hearing groups are going to have to face up to price competition the like of which they have never seen before.

Before Specsavers arrived in Australia some ten years ago, there was considerable study of the retail optical market here, which is said to have convinced the company that retail prices for glasses Down Under were about 40 per cent too high. The company said it would act to change that, and, like it or lump it, there’s no doubt it has – capturing approaching 50 per cent market share in the process.

Specsavers is now doing more business than the whole market was worth when it arrived here, the 50 per cent now being in a market that has about doubled. Yes, there are anecdotal claims about the company’s actions, but such a market share surely indicates

Read More >

By | August 29th, 2017|Comment|

• From top of page

What it was all about:

An ex-parte injunction granted by the Federal Court of Australia to the Optical Manufacturers & Distributors Association of Australia against Expertise Events on 16 December 2016 was thrown out “in its entirety” by Justice Burley on 3 March.

Justice Burley found that ODMA had not made out its claim that the court should maintain the injunction against EE and that the evidence did not indicate any material harm would occur to ODMA if the injunction was discharged.

The injunction was granted by Justice Farrell of the Federal Court on 16 December against EE, the former organiser of ODMA’s 2013 and 2015 trade exhibitions, after hearing ODMA’s claim that EE had breached its intellectual property rights by soliciting for business using ODMA’s address information, as well as being in breach of copyright.

EE not present when orders were made

EE was not notified of the application hearing and was not present when the orders were made by Justice Farrell.

The injunction meant that EE was unable to use its own address lists from 16 December until the injuction was discharged by Justice Burley on 3 March ­– a critical period to seek exhibitors and attract visitors to the SILMO Sydney exhibition, which commences this coming Thursday at the

Read More >

By | August 29th, 2017|Legal|

Majority of US contact-lens wearers risk infection

A MAJORITY of contact-lens wearers in the United States risk serious eye infections by not taking enough care, according to research published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A report published in CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report this week found 85% of adolescent contact-lens wearers admit at least one habit that increases the chance of an eye infection.

Based on wear-and-care habits

The CDC data, based on the wear-and-care habits of an estimated 3 million adolescents aged 12 to 17 years, coincided with the fourth US Contact-Lens Health Week on 21-15 August.

The report says that in total, 44% of adolescents did not have an eye examination once a year, while 30% slept wearing lenses and 27% swam while wearing them.

By comparison, 81% of young adults, aged 18-24, and 87% of adults, aged 25 and older, reported a risky habit.

The most frequently reported risky habits among young adults and adults were not replacing lenses as often as prescribed, among around half, and not regularly replacing storage cases, among 42%.

‘Contact lenses are a safe and effective way to correct your vision when they are worn and cared for as recommended,’ Dr Jennifer Cope, medical epidemiologist in CDC’s Waterborne Disease Prevention Branch, said. ‘However, adolescents and adults can improve the way they take

Read More >

By | August 24th, 2017|Health|

Federal health chief quits

THE secretary of the federal health department, Mr Martin Bowles, has resigned, leaving the government to find someone else to fill the position after 1 September.

Mr Bowles resigned on 21 August after three years heading the health department under health ministers Mr Peter Dutton, Ms Sussan Ley and, most recently, Mr Greg Hunt.

His resignation comes as the government embarks on a program of reform of the complex health insurance system.

He is the seventh department secretary to quit since the start of last year.

 

By | August 24th, 2017|People|

Ulysses comments …

THERE are plenty of online stories about how spectacle frames and lenses are manufactured; the different materials used in manufacture; and some information on machinery and equipment.

What’s noticeable is the difference in the look of machinery and equipment, with some looking just about ready to collapse in a heap, and certainly in need of a good coat of paint, while others look as though they had just been installed that very day.

What’s also noticeable is the look of absolute boredom on the faces of  the people using the machinery and equipment. Surely HR can improve their lot  – and the safety precautions?

By | August 24th, 2017|Comment|

ACBO and OA respond to RANZCO’s condemnation of behavioural optometry

The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists’ condemnation of behavioural optometry has been responded to by the Australasian College of Behavioural Optometrists and by Optometry Australia.

On 9 August, RANZCO said in a media release that a report on Channel 7 on behavioural optometry:

  • Failed to acknowledge the lack of research and evidence to support the practice;
  • Primary dyslexia and learning disabilities are complex neurocognitive conditions and are not caused by vision problems; there is no evidence to suggest that eye exercises, behavioural vision therapy, or special tinted filters or lenses improve the long-term educational performance of people affected by dyslexia or other learning disabilities; and
  • That it is irresponsible to promote behavioural optometry to treat those conditions without letting people know that it is an unproven practice and that parents of children with dyslexia and other learning disabilities want to do what’s best for their children and it is unfair to give them false hope in expensive treatments and aids for which there is no evidence.

ACBO’s response

In response, the Australasian College of Behavioural Optometrists said RANZCO’s media release was ‘an inaccurate and misleading statement’.

Also, ‘behavioural optometrists do not diagnose and treat learning disabilities or dyslexia. They treat problems of vision function, including focusing, eye coordination and eye movements,

Read More >

By | August 22nd, 2017|Health|

ACO launches new education program

The Australian College of Optometry has launched the first in a series of online programs for optometrists to enable them to self assess their knowledge of specific eye conditions and their ability to provide an initial diagnosis of the condition, within a simulated and timed patient consultation.

The program developed by the ACO in consultation with the wider optometry community, was piloted by registered optometrists (including ACO members) and aims to ultimately support the delivery of best-practice eye-health care.

The first program to be released is for initial glaucoma diagnosis and will be followed by other self-assessment programs including diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, high myopia and anterior eye.

Glaucoma self-assessment program

First up, the new program covers the ability to self-assess glaucoma diagnostic skills online within a simulated and timed patient consultation using real life patient case studies.

This new program aims to assist optometrists in assessing their diagnostic knowledge and selecting further education to improve any learning gaps. Nine clinical skills are assessed by using real and practical case studies reflecting critical thinking and decision making processes which occur in clinical practice. A time cap on each test presents an additional level of real-time challenge.

The program provides colour-coded results, benchmarking against peers, specific tailored feedback and ACO further education options.

Each program costs $100 plus

Read More >

By | August 22nd, 2017|Education|

New $10 banknote to have tactile features

The new $10 banknote to be released into general circulation from 20 September will have tactile features, following the release of the new $5 banknote last year.

The tactile features includes two raised bumps on each of the long edges of the banknote.

In his announcement, the Governor of the Reserve Bank, Philip Lowe, said: ‘The new [$10] notes contain the same world-leading security features as the new $5 note, including a clear top-to-bottom window, and a tactile feature so that it can be recognised by vision-impaired members of the community.’

The Reserve Bank issues Australia’s bank notes.

The new $10 banknote continues to feature two of Australia’s most prominent writers, Dame Mary Gilmore and AB ‘Banjo’ Paterson.

By | August 22nd, 2017|People|