‘Bionic’ retina implant to undergo clinical feasibility study in US

A ‘bionic’ retina implant is to undergo clinical feasibility study in the United States.

The study follows the United States Food & Drug Administration’s approval of the study of Pixium Vision’s PRIMA device.

France-based Pixium Vision says the clinical feasibility study should begin in the first half of this year at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

Up to five patients who have lost their sight because of atrophic dry AMD are set to be fitted with a ‘bionic’ retinal implant designed to restore some basic visual function. Pixium’s FDA approval comes just a few months after health authorities in France permitted a similar trial there, with five patients set to receive the implant at a Paris hospital.

The PRIMA system, which uses external glasses in combination with the implant, is designed to provide partial restoration of the patient’s visual function through electrical stimulation of retinal neurons, with the sub-retina implanted stimulator replacing part of the degenerated photoreceptors.

More information: http://optics.org/news/8/12/44.

By | February 4th, 2018|Surgery|

Transplanted retinal cells cause swelling to retina; not likely to affect future clinical studies

A patient who underwent transplant surgery using retinal cells derived from artificially-derived induced pluripotent stem cells has suffered a swollen retina, according to researchers from Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital and the Japan-government-backed Riken Institute.

The research team said it is the first time a patient has developed a serious adverse reaction during the clinical research to assess the feasibility of using iPSCs.

Surgeons operated on the patient, who is in his 70s, to remove pre-retinal membrane, deemed to be the cause of the retinal oedema. The team was unable to improve the symptoms despite the administration of steroid and anti-VEGF medication.

Dr Masayo Takahashi, MD, a researcher at Riken who heads the team, said: “We cannot deny the causal correlation with iPS cells.”

Dr Takahashi said the symptom falls into the category of serious cases, as it requires hospital admission for treatment, but stressed that it is “neither a matter of great urgency nor life-threatening.”

The incident most likely will not affect future clinical studies on the transplantation of iPS-derived retinal cells in patients with severe eye diseases, Dr Takahashi said.

The patient’s condition improved after the removal of pre-retinal membrane. The team believes the oedema was caused by a reverse in the flow of a liquid solution containing retinal cells derived from iPS

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By | February 4th, 2018|Surgery|

‘Bionic’ retina implant to undergo clinical feasibility study in United States

A ‘bionic’ retina implant is to undergo clinical feasibility study in the United States.

The study follows the United States Food & Drug Administration’s approval of the study of Pixium Vision’s PRIMA device.

France-based Pixium Vision says the clinical feasibility study should begin in the first half of this year at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

Up to five patients who have lost their sight because of atrophic dry AMD are set to be fitted with a ‘bionic’ retinal implant designed to restore some basic visual function. Pixium’s FDA approval comes just a few months after health authorities in France permitted a similar trial there, with five patients set to receive the implant at a Paris hospital.

The PRIMA system, which uses external glasses in combination with the implant, is designed to provide partial restoration of the patient’s visual function through electrical stimulation of retinal neurons, with the sub-retina implanted stimulator replacing part of the degenerated photoreceptors.

 

By | January 24th, 2018|Surgery|

Transplanted retinal cells cause swelling to retina; not likely to affect future clinical studies

A patient who underwent transplant surgery using retinal cells derived from artificially derived induced pluripotent stem cells has suffered a swollen retina, according to researchers from Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital and the Japan-government-backed Riken Institute.

The research team said it is the first time a patient has developed a serious adverse reaction during the clinical research to assess the feasibility of using iPSCs.

Surgeons operated on the patient, who is in his 70s, to remove pre-retinal membrane, deemed to be the cause of the retinal oedema. The team was unable to improve the symptoms despite the administration of steroid and anti-VEGF medication.

Causal correlation

Dr Masayo Takahashi, MD, a researcher at Riken who heads the team, said, “We cannot deny the causal correlation with iPS cells.”

She said the symptom falls into the category of serious cases, as it requires hospital admission for treatment, but stressed that it is “neither a matter of great urgency nor life-threatening.”

The incident most likely will not affect future clinical studies on the transplantation of iPS-derived retinal cells in patients with severe eye diseases, Dr Takahashi said. \The patient’s condition improved after the removal of pre-retinal membrane.

Reverse in flow of liquid

The team believes the oedema was caused by a reverse in the flow of a liquid solution containing

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By | January 24th, 2018|Surgery|

248,000 cataract procedures in 2015-16

A total of 248,000 cataract-extraction procedures were carried out in Australian hospitals in 2015-16, according to a report by the Canberra-based Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

Ninety-seven per cent of the procedures involved surgery and were carried out on the same day. They were the highest hospitalisations per 1,000 population.

The 248,000 procedures was 62 per cent of the total of 397,000 eye procedures undertaken during 2015-16 (the other two procedures totalling 56,000 for macular degeneration and 6,000 for glaucoma).

All up, there were 1,331 hospitals providing in-hospital services of all kinds – 701 public and 630 private – totalling 10.6 million hospitalisations.

There were about 360,000 full-time equivalent staff employed in providing public hospital services, of which 41 per cent were nurses, 12 per cent salaried medical officers and 16% diagnostic and allied health professionals.

Private hospitals employed about 66,800 full-time equivalent staff, 56 per cent of whom were nurses, 29 per cent were salaried medical officers and 6 per cent were diagnostic and allied health professionals.

Procedures on the eye and adnexa were carried out in private hospitals, including cataract surgery).

For cataract extraction, 3 per 1,000 hospitalisations were followed by a readmission within 28 days, compared to tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy, for example, of 35 per 1,000 readmission within 28 days.

Waiting time for public-hospital

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By | July 26th, 2017|Surgery|